Orders from Headquarters, 97th Infantry Division

(These orders were re-typed for clarity)

(The actual serial numbers have been replaced with Ser #  for privacy concerns)

 

 

 

R-E-S-T-R-I-C-T-E-D

HEADQUARTERS 97TH INFANTRY DIVISION

 

                                                           APO 445

                                                           11 June 1945

GENERAL ORDERS

 

NUMBER     38

 

                      SECTION

           SILVER STAR—Awards—Posthumous awards             I

           SLIVER STAR—AWARDS                               II

           BRONZE STAR MEDAL—Posthumous awards              III

           BRONZE STAR MEDAL—Awards                         IV

          

 

     I.  SILVER STAR. Under provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Silver Star is awarded posthumously, to the following officer and enlisted men:

 

     Second Lieutenant Charles P. Phelps, Ser #, Company “F”, 386th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 16 April 1945, Lieutenant Phelps was selected to reconnoiter, seize and hold sites upon the Wupper River, in Germany, across which a battalion attack could be launched.  Fighting their way to the river, Lieutenant Phelps and his men seized two unguarded bridges.  After deploying his men to cover the bridge, Lieutenant Phelps fearlessly led four men over the bridge to seize high ground on the far side to protect the bridge site.  During this advance he was met with heavy enemy fire from concealed positions and killed.  Lieutenant Phelps’ gallantry on this occasion for which he made the supreme sacrifice reflected high credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Michigan.

 

     Private First Class Gennare Pompilio, Ser #, Company “I” 386th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 10 April 1945, near Hulsheid, Germany, Private Pompilio unhesitatingly volunteered to cover the withdrawal of men of his company who were evacuating a seriously wounded man.  In the face of heavy enemy fire at a range of 300 yards, Private Pompilio effectively placed fire upon the enemy position until the wounded man was removed to a place of safety.  While fighting his way back to his platoon, Private Pompilio was killed. His gallantry on this occasion for which he made the supreme sacrifice reflected high credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from New York.

 

     II.   SILVER STAR. Under provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Silver Star is awarded to the following officer and enlisted men:

 

            Captain Truman C. Beeson, Ser #, Company “E” 303d Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  In an attack on the city of Siegburg, Germany, on 9 April 1945, Captain Beeson’s company encountered strong enemy resistance and its advance was slowed.  He personally led a platoon in an attack against the hostile positions and silenced an enemy machine gun enabling his company to capture its objective.  On the following morning when two enemy pill boxes again held up the company advance Captain Beeson took personal command of the assaulting troops, maneuvered them to an advantageous position, reduced the strong points, and captured approximately two hundred of the enemy.  By his bold, fearless leadership Captain Beeson inspired his men and their attainments contributed in a large measure to the success of the operation.  His aggressiveness and gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Louisiana.

 

     First Lieutenant Thomas F. Collingwood, Ser #, Company “A” 386th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  Near Oberkassel, Germany on the night of 2 April 1945, Lieutenant Collingwood fearlessly led a reconnaissance patrol across the Rhine River, in Germany, in the face of heavily defended enemy positions.  With his progress being constantly harassed by enemy flares and searchlights, Lieutenant Collingwood landed on the enemy shore and obtained valuable information as to the enemy dispositions.  Returning to his unit, the patrol was brought under heavy enemy fire.  Lieutenant Collingwood, demonstrating courage and leadership brought his men back without casualties.  His daring and gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from California.

 

     Technical Sergeant David N. Robinson, Ser #, Company “I” 386th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 10 April 1945, near Hulscheid, Germany, when his company’s advance was halted by intense artillery and small arms fire, Technical Sergeant Robinson, and another soldier, fearlessly moved forward to within 20 yards of an enemy 88mm gun position, killed one of the enemy and captured three.  Upon returning the prisoners to his unit, Technical Sergeant Robinson learned that his comrade had been seriously wounded in the action.  Unhesitatingly and without utter regard of his own safety, Technical Sergeant Robinson moved forward under heavy small arms fire and removed the wounded man to a place of safety. His gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

     Staff Sergeant Alec J. Vargo, Ser #, Company “K” 386th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  While engaged in an assault on the town of Felderhof, Germany, on 9 April 1945, Staff Sergeant Vargo voluntarily left a position of comparative safety and fearlessly moved down a fire-swept street.  With heavy enemy fire falling all about him, Staff Sergeant Vargo, firing a rocket launcher, destroyed an enemy machine gun and a 20mm flak gun.  His gallant action permitted the rapid capture of the town and reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Michigan.

 

     Staff Sergeant Joseph F. Roggenburg, Ser #, Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 24 April 1945 near Huntsbach, Germany, Staff Sergeant Roggenburg was a member of a road reconnaissance patrol which came upon an enemy machine gun position.  After returning and reporting the position of the gun Staff Sergeant Roggenburg volunteered to guide a patrol to attack the position.  Approaching the enemy gun, he challenged it and was met with heavy fire which wounded one man of the patrol.  In the face of enemy fire, Staff Sergeant Roggenburg helped to remove the casualty to a ditch and move to the rear for assistance.  After calling for fire upon the position, Staff Sergeant Roggenburg guided an aid man to his fallen comrade. His gallantry on this occasion reflects high credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from New York.

 

     Sergeant Max Randleman, Ser #, Company “E”, 303d Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 2 May 1945, Sergeant Randleman was advancing with his company in an assault on Hermansreuth, Germany, when it came under withering enemy fire.  With utter disregard of his own safety, Sergeant Randleman advanced alone over 100 yards of open terrain to a position from which he placed such effective machine gun fire upon the enemy positions that his company’s advance could continue. His courageousness and gallantry on this occasion reflect high credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Arkansas.

 

     Sergeant Carl A. Meeks, (then Private First Class), Ser #, Company “I”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 14 April 1945, near Schildgen, Germany, when a rifle company’s advance was halted by intense enemy fire, Sergeant Meeks boldly moved forward under heavy fire to a position from which, firing rifle grenades, he silenced three enemy machine guns and a 20mm gun and forced their withdrawal of numerous enemy riflemen. His daring and gallantry on this occasion permitted his company to advance and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Oregon.

 

     Private First Class Meryl L. Groninger, Ser #, Company “D”, 303d Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  In an Assault crossing the Sieg River, in Germany, on 9 April 1945, Private Groninger, an ammunition bearer, was severely wounded in the hand and leg by enemy fire.  During the next thirty hours of heavy combat, Private Groninger continued in the performance of his duties without reporting his injuries and without receiving medical attention.  Only when his officers noticed that he was wounded and ordered his evacuation dir Private Groninger consent to be treated.  His splendid display of willingness and gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Kansas.

 

     Private First Class Anthony W. Globis, Ser #, Company “A”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 13 April 1945 near Wahlscheid, Germany, Private Globis was sent to make a bridge reconnaissance.  After advancing 2000 yards he came upon a road bridge which was mined an protected by three enemy soldiers.  Though outnumbered, Private Globis unhesitatingly crawled to a position from which he could place fire upon the enemy troops and forced their surrender.  He then audaciously required his prisoners to deactivate the mines and returned them to his own lines.  Private Globis’ boldness and gallantry on this occasion permitted his company to advance and reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

     Private First Class Lewis W. Twibell, Ser #, Company “A”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 2 May 1945, while a member of a combat patrol which came under intense fire near Konraditz, Czechoslovakia, Private Twibell unhesitatingly volunteered to go to summon aid.  He fearlessly crossed 1000 yards of open terrain with enemy fire falling all about him and brought up reinforcements which relieved the halted patrol.  His splendid display of willingness and gallantry reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Indiana.

 

     Private First Class Delbert Isaacs, Ser #, Company “K”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 25 April 1945, during an attack on the city of Eger, Czechoslovakia, Private Isaac volunteered, with another soldier, to contact friendly troops within the city with whom his platoon was out of communication.  Boldly dashing across 800 yards of open terrain under heavy enemy fire of all types, he contacted the friendly troops and returned to his platoon with enemy small arms fire falling all about him.  He then led elements of his platoon into the city over dangerously exposed ground.  Private Isaacs’ daring and gallantry on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Kentucky.

 

     Private First Class Alford Popp, Ser #, Company “K”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 25 April 1945, during an attack on the city of Eger, Czechoslovakia, Private Popp volunteered, with another soldier, to contact friendly troops within the city with whom his platoon was out of communication.  Boldly dashing across 800 yards of open terrain under heavy enemy fire of all types, he contacted the friendly troops and returned to his platoon with enemy small arms fire falling all about him.  He then led elements of his platoon into the city over dangerously exposed ground.  Private Popp’s daring and gallantry on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Kentucky.

 

     Private First Class Elmer L. Diede, Ser #, Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 24 April 1945, near Huntsback, Germany, Private Diede was a member of a road reconnaissance patrol which came upon an enemy machine gun position.  After returning and reporting the position of the gun Private Diede volunteered to guide a patrol to attack the position.  Approaching and challenging the enemy gun, he was met with heavy fire which wounded one man of the patrol.  In the face of enemy fire, Private Diede helped to remove the casualty to a ditch and remained there with him with enemy machine gun fire falling and ricocheting all about them until the wounded man died in his arms. Private Diede’s gallantry on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from North Dakota.

 

     Private First Class Billy H. Pruitt, (then Private), Ser #, Medical Detachment, 303d infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On 30 April 1945, Near Barnau, Germany, Private Pruitt unhesitatingly went to the side of a wounded officer in the face of heavy enemy fire and administered aid.  He then crawled to the side of another wounded man and administered aid until the casualty he was attending was again hit by enemy fire and died.  Only when it was determined that further aid was useless dir Private Pruitt withdraw to a place of safety.  His disregard for his own safety and his gallantry on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces.  Entered military service from Indiana.

 

III.  BRONZE STAR MEDAL. Under provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Bronze Star Medal is awarded to the following officer and enlisted men:

 

      Private First Class Veryl W. Diem, Ser #, Company “M”, 386th Infantry Regiment, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 14 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

IV.  BRONZE STAR MEDAL. Under provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Bronze Star Medal is awarded to the following officer and enlisted men:

 

     Brigadier General Sherman V Hasbrouck, Ser #, Headquarters 97th Infantry Division Artillery, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 25 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from New York.

 

     Lieutenant Colonel Alexander J. Sutherland, Ser #, 303d Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 9 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from New York.

 

     Lieutenant Colonel Dennis J. McMahon, Ser #, Headquarters, 3d Battalion, 387th Infantry Regiment, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 24 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from New York.

 

     Captain Joseph W. Compton, Ser #, Medical Detachment, 387th Infantry Regiment, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 26 April 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Illinois.

 

     First Lieutenant Thomas F. Collingwood, Ser #, Company “A”, 386th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 11 April 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Illinois.

 

     Sergeant Fred G. Bouman, Ser #, Company “B”, 387th Infantry Regiment, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 7 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Ohio.

 

     Sergeant William L. Heidel, Ser #, Company “A”, 322d Engineer Combat Battalion, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 2 May 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Indiana.

 

     Technician Fourth Grade Eugene A. Lillis, Ser #, Battery “A”, 922d Field Artillery Battalion, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 25 April 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

     Technician Fifth Grade Joseph A. Zimmerman, Ser #, Battery “A”, 922d Field Artillery Battalion, for meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 25 April 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Illinois.

 

     Technician Fifth Grade LaDurin H Sherwood, Ser #, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 303d Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 25 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Michigan.

 

     Private First Class Edwin G. Brown, Ser #, Company “D”, 303d Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 11 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from South Dakota.

 

     Private First Class Paul F. Thon, Ser #, Company “I”, 387th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 2 May 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Michigan.

 

     Private First Class William R. Tinney, Ser #, Company “F”, 386th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 24 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

     Private First Class Frank T. Holmes, Ser #, Company “G”, 386th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 3 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Massachusetts.

 

     Private First Class Campbell L. Reed, Ser #, Company “B”, 386th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 24 April 1945, in Czechoslovakia.  Entered military service from Pennsylvania.

 

     Private First Class Leonard Gibson, Ser #, Company “M”, 387th Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 14 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Kentucky.

 

     Private First Class Walter F. Stecker, Jr., Ser #,Medical Detatchment, 3o3d Infantry Regiment, for heroic achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 14 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from Texas.

 

     Private First Class Howard A. Winebarger, Ser #, Company “B”, 303d Infantry Regiment, for Meritorious achievement in a military operation against an armed enemy of the United States on 9 April 1945, in Germany.  Entered military service from North Carolina.

 

R-E-S-T-R-I-C-T-E-D

 

 

 

R-E-S-T-R-I-C-T-E-D

HEADQUARTERS 97TH INFANTRY DIVISION

 

                                                           APO 445

                                                           11 June 1945

GENERAL ORDERS

 

NUMBER     39

 

                      SECTION

           SILVER STAR—Awards—Posthumous awards             I

 

 

     I.  SILVER STAR. Under provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Silver Star is awarded posthumously, to the following officer:

 

     First Lieutenant John P. Mattfeldt, Ser #, Company “M”, 387th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by gallantry in action in connection with a military operation against an armed enemy.  On an assault on the city of Egar, Czechoslovakia on 25 April 1945, Lieutenant Mattfeldt, commanding a platoon of machine guns attached to the leading elements of the assault forces, came under heavy enemy fire from two nearby strong points.  Putting his gun into operation, Lieutenant Mattfeldt forced the withdrawal of the enemy troops and continued the advance across a ravine in the face of enemy machine gun fire for a distance of 75 yards.  He entered the city with the first troops and encountered heavy fire which halted the advance.  Fearlessly moving ahead of the riflemen, Lieutenant Mattfeldt placed heavy fire on the enemy while moving down a fire swept street.  Deploying his guns at an important intersection Lieutenant Mattfeldt was killed by a sudden burst of fire from concealed enemy positions.   His gallantry in this action for which he made the supreme sacrifice reflected great credit upon himself and the armed forces.

 

BY COMMAND OF BREGADIER GENERAL HALSEY:

 

                                                      EDWARD O. WOLF

                                               COLONEL, GENERAL STAFF CORPS

                                                      CHIEF OF STAFF

 

OFFICIAL:

 

    

              ORIGINAL SIGNED

          X. A. GILMORE, JR

     Captain, Adjutant General’s Department

         Assistant Adjutant General

 

DISTRIBUTION:

A, B, E & K

 

R-E-S-T-R-I-C-T-E-D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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